As The House... by This Piano Plays Itself
2010 CD
"As The House..." is This Piano Plays Itself second release.

"This Piano Plays Itself gracefully infuses patterns with lush guitars and hushed vocals; a sound reminiscent of My Bloody Valentine mixed with Slint's dynamic song structures. This Piano Plays Itself is capable of epic storytelling that whirls and whisks lyrical ideas repeating throughout songs until they gain new meaning." - The Other Sound

Mastered by Carl Saff

MP3 Sample of ...It Fills With Light

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Adair Park recording artist This Piano Plays Itself are back for another jam session with their album As the House... An album with many sides, at times the sound is pure indie-rock, other times it aims more towards the pop sound. Creative Loafing describes their sound as "wide-scoped rock," whatever that means. Interestingly enough, a band that calls themselves This Piano Plays Itself doesn't actually feature a piano as the main attraction of the record!

A much more electric guitar-driven record, As the House..., like many rock albums, has been built with many elements from The Beatles later psychedelic LPs. In just about every of the eight songs, there's a little bit of Revolver. This is a good thing though, because even the weaker tracks are based on the best. Not to say This Piano Plays Itself are on Beatle Piano-player mode, these guys have a sound and feel of their own.

A semi-concept album, with titles such as "Who We Were," "When We Got There" and "Why We Stayed," the LP seems to want to detail a lot about this musical story. Vocally, musically and lyrically, the band seems very focused, but still there lies an element of fluidity in the compositions that set this record aside from other indie releases.

"Who We Were," the most refreshing and commercial track on the album, is pumped with energy and atmosphere. The moody track has a breath of pop, but isn't tied down to any of the genres, allowing it to show all the sides of the band. A bit dark, a bit dreamy, and it's definitely a bit possible this song will break the group through to mainstream success.

The band gets their most whimsical on "How We Left," a mix of rock, folk, and, of course, an accordion. Quite the charming song, even if sonically it has nothing to do with the rest of the album. No matter, what these guys are about is fun. And fun it is!

Other tracks like "Where We Lived" and "What Happened" range from sullen rock to explosive experimental. The record doesn't expand much from there, but with only eight songs on the LP, that's no insult.

The group has already garnered attention for their live shows, making Creative Loafing's pick for best live shows of the week, and with their sophomore album already creative a buzz online and off. No doubt that the boys of This Piano Plays Itself are set to play themselves right into success. - Eric Chavez / Atlanta Music Guide

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"This Piano Plays Itself is the Atlanta, Georgia-based quintet comprised of Eric Bouthiller, Aaron Golden, Justin Newton, Jayson Nix, and Doug Saylor. These guys write and record a strangely hypnotic brand of modern pop that combines classic instrumentation with modern electronics. Some of the tracks are rather poppy in nature...while others have qualities that are perplexing and mind-expanding (which may explain why the press release mentioned the term "mushroom rock"). Lots of interesting stuff going on here...but our own particular favorite song is "What Happened"...which is how you may feel after listening to the fourth track (!). Really cool and unconventional pop stuff. Atlanta, Georgia is producing more and more eclectic and obscure artists these days...and This Piano Plays Itself is most certainly both." - Baby Sue

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"With As the House... flowing continuously through a series of tracks objectively named with titles such as "Who We Were," "Where We Lived" and "What Happened," Atlanta-based quintet This Piano Plays Itself weaves a storyline that presents itself as an epic and unremitting piece of music.

The majority of the songs begin with tranquil tones gradually crescendoing into climactic peaks within each melody, while reverb-rich guitar and synth embed themselves-layered beneath billowing movements of echoing, and often staggered, vocals. Imagine borrowing a spacey shoegaze element from My Bloody Valentine and provoking it with the spasticity and fervor of Godspeed! You Black Emperor. With such lush guitars and circling synth patterns, it's not difficult to speculate why the band's sound has been referred to as "mushroom rock," as its textured contours are capable of producing an out-of-body experience.

Amid the whirls of fuzzy riffs and aching vocals comes an occasional and brief burst of electro dance-pop, heard namely within "It Fills with Life" and "What Happened," but with such solemn surroundings, it's hardly enough to alleviate the gravity of the shadowy album. If anything, it just serves as a nod to death disco. Although most songs rely on a thick sound with flurries of loops and electronic tricks, "How We Left" and "Why We Stayed" emerge as unexpectedly stripped-down melodies with harmonized vocals complimented by a horn line and an array of acoustic folk instruments. This unanticipated change in the album's development pushes the record out of its drugged state into a more grounded and lucid existence." - Jessica Smith

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"This Piano Plays Itself makes post-rock of the emotional variety, the kind that gets Explosions in the Sky those big soundtrack dollars. This isn't build-build-crush like Mogwai or groove-groove-groove like Tortoise. It swells then overwhelms by sounding huge and pretty, not by brute force. Every once in awhile, glimpses of songs make their way to the surface.

By the end, though, those glimpses become more fleshed out. They unexpectedly throw in a couple folk songs on the album's second half, which is a sharp contrast to the spacey sounds found elsewhere. It makes it sound like there's a conversation going on, two voices present on the album. Kind of like what Liars did on Drum's Not Dead, but friendlier. Fittingly, the album ends with an extended post-rock track where the instruments eventually fall out and leave behind only the band members' voices, singing in unison the lyric that gives the album it's name. It's ambitious stuff that hits its target. Listen to it all at once." - Little Advances

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"Adair Park Recordings artists This Piano Plays Itself are back for another jam session with their album As the House.... An album with many sides, at times the sound is pure indie-rock, other times it aims more towards the pop sound. Creative Loafing describes their sound as "wide-scoped rock," whatever that means. Interestingly enough, a band that calls themselves This Piano Plays Itself doesn't actually feature a piano as the main attraction of the record!

A much more electric guitar-driven record, As the House..., like many rock albums, has been built with many elements from The Beatles later psychedelic LPs. In just about every of the eight songs, there's a little bit of Revolver. This is a good thing though, because even the weaker tracks are based on the best. Not to say This Piano Plays Itself are on Beatle Piano-player mode, these guys have a sound and feel of their own.

A semi-concept album, with titles such as "Who We Were," "When We Got There" and "Why We Stayed," the LP seems to want to detail a lot about this musical story. Vocally, musically and lyrically, the band seems very focused, but still there lies an element of fluidity in the compositions that set this record aside from other indie releases.

"Who We Were," the most refreshing and commercial track on the album, is pumped with energy and atmosphere. The moody track has a breath of pop, but isn't tied down to any of the genres, allowing it to show all the sides of the band. A bit dark, a bit dreamy, and it's definitely a bit possible this song will break the group through to mainstream success.

The band gets their most whimsical on "How We Left," a mix of rock, folk, and, of course, an accordion. Quite the charming song, even if sonically it has nothing to do with the rest of the album. No matter, what these guys are about is fun. And fun it is!

Other tracks like "Where We Lived" and "What Happened" range from sullen rock to explosive experimental. The record doesn't expand much from there, but with only eight songs on the LP, that's no insult.

The group has already garnered attention for their live shows, making Creative Loafing's pick for best live shows of the week, and with their sophomore album already creative a buzz online and off. No doubt that the boys of This Piano Plays Itself are set to play themselves right into success." - Vibeology

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"After piecing their debut full-length together over much of 2009, the band released As The House this past year. The lengthy writing and recording process paid off greatly, as the record emerges as a dynamic and powerful work. "What Happened" roars with a sense of distorted determination, while "Who We Were" demonstrates psych-rock at its finest. This Piano Plays Itself ebbs and flows with bits of textured noise throughout the record, seamlessly shifting out of one movement and into the next. From start to finish, As The House exudes a compelling energy that remains as hypnotic as it is formidable.

However, to peg As The House as a purely post-rock or shoegaze album would be misleading, because This Piano Plays Itself also contains folk roots typically unassociated with the genre. "We wrote half of those main parts on the porch with acoustic guitars and banjos," Bouthiller explains. "So a lot of that was folk-influenced." These folk parts reveal themselves as oases within the tense buildups of their songs, particularly on tracks like "How We Left" and "Why We Stayed". Not only do these moments allow As The House to breathe, but they also make the dynamic much more impactful.

This Piano Plays Itself glimmers as a beacon of hope for Atlanta post-rock-a genre all too absent in this city. As The House stood as one of the best local records of 2010, managing to do so in a town ruled by punk rock and hip-hop acts. It's in this regard that the piano has been played all by itself, resonating throughout the space between our ears in a way that shines as equal parts experimental, accessible, and compelling." - Max Blau / Consequence Of Sound